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Home / Technology / coParenter helps divorced parents settle disputes using A.I. and human mediation – TechCrunch

coParenter helps divorced parents settle disputes using A.I. and human mediation – TechCrunch


A former judge and family law educator has teamed up with tech entrepreneurs to launch an app they hope will help divorced parents better manage their co-parenting disputes, communications, shared calendar, and other decisions within a single platform. The app, called coParenter, aims to be more comprehensive than its competitors, while also leveraging a combination of A.I. technology and on-demand human interaction to help co-parents navigate high-conflict situations.

The idea for coParenter emerged from co-founder Hon. Sherrill A. Ellsworth’s personal experience and entrepreneur Jonathan Verk, who had been through a divorce himself.

Ellsworth had been a presiding judge of the Superior Court in Riverside County, California for 20 years and a family law educator for ten. During this time, she saw firsthand how families were destroyed by today’s legal system.

“I witnessed countless families torn apart as they slogged through the family law system. I saw how families would battle over the simplest of disagreements like where their child will go to school, what doctor they should see and what their diet should be — all matters that belong at home, not in a courtroom,” she says.

Ellsworth also notes that 80 percent of the disagreements presented in the courtroom didn’t even require legal intervention – but most of the cases she presided over involved parents asking the judge to make the co-parenting decision.

As she came to the end of her career, she began to realize the legal system just wasn’t built for these sorts of situations.

She then met Jonathan Verk, previously EVP Strategic Partnerships at Shazam and now coParenter CEO. Verk had just divorced himself and had an idea about how technology could help make the co-parenting process easier. He already had on board his longtime friend and serial entrepreneur Eric Weiss, now COO, to help build the system. But he needed someone with legal expertise.

That’s how coParenter was born.

The app, also built by CTO Niels Hansen, today exists alongside a whole host of other tools built for different aspects of the coparenting process.

That includes those apps designed to document communication like OurFamilyWizard, Talking Parents, AppClose, and Divvito Messenger; those for sharing calendars, like Custody Connection, Custody X Exchange, Alimentor; and even those that offer a combination of features like WeParent, 2houses, SmartCoparent, and Fayr, among others.

But the team at coParenter argues that their app covers all aspects of coparenting, including communication, documentation, calendar and schedule sharing, location-based tools for pickup and dropoff logging, expense tracking and reimbursements, schedule change requests, tools for making decisions on day-to-day parenting choices like haircuts, diet, allowance, use of media, etc., and more.

Notably, coParenter also offers a “solo mode” – meaning you can use the app even if the other co-parent refuses to do the same. This is a key feature that many rival apps lack.

However, the biggest differentiator is how coParenter puts a mediator of sorts in your pocket.

The app begins by using A.I., machine learning, and sentiment analysis technology to keep conversations civil. The tech will jump in to flag curse words, inflammatory phrases and offense names to keep a heated conversation from escalating – much like a human mediator would do when trying to calm two warring parties.

When conversations take a bad turn, the app will pop up a warning message that asks the parent if they’re sure they want to use that term, allowing them time to pause and think. (If only social media platforms had built features like this!)

 

When parents need more assistance, they can opt to use the app instead of turning to lawyers.

The company offers on-demand access to professionals as both monthly ($12.99/mo – 20 credits, or enough for 2 mediations) or yearly ($119.99/year – 240 credits) subscriptions. Both parents can subscribe for $199.99/year, each receiving 240 credits.

“Comparatively, an average hour with a lawyer costs between $250 and upwards of $200, just to file a single motion,” Ellsworth says.

These professionals are not mediators, but are licensed in their respective fields – typically family law attorneys, therapists, social workers, or other retired bench officers with strong conflict resolution backgrounds. Ellsworth oversees the professionals to ensure they have the proper guidance.

All communication between the parent and the professional is considered confidential and not subject to admission as evidence, as the goal is to stay out of the courts. However, all the history and documentation elsewhere in the app can be used in court, if the parents do end up there.

The app has been in beta for nearly a year, and officially launched this January. To date, coParenter claims it’s already helped to resolve over 4,000 disputes and over 2,000 co-parents have used it for scheduling. 81 percent of the disputing parents resolved all their issues in the app, without needed a professional mediator or legal professional, the company says.

CoParenter is available on both iOS and Android.

Source Link: coParenter helps divorced parents settle disputes using A.I. and human mediation – TechCrunch

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